Transition and Relocation

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Transition and Relocation

Moving to a new home with new surroundings even in the best of circumstances is stressful. It takes careful planning and coordination of logistics, and there is also an emotional element involved.   Often adult children are geographically dispersed and/or have busy family lives of their own making involvement with their parent’s move difficult. This causes stress for the entire family, and a move becomes a burden.

Seniors in Stride understands these challenges. We work closely with clients and their families to develop a seamless transition and relocation plan – we take the stress out of your move!

We will pare down your items and sort them into Keep, Donate, Sell and Dispose.

You can opt for a few services to compliment what you are able to manage, or we can manage the entire move for you, from packing up the home, staging it for sale, overseeing movers to full set up in the new home – complete with artwork hung, beds made and everything neatly in place. Great care is taken to recreate a feeling of familiarity in your new space, which helps to ease you into your new surroundings, and avoid the risk of developing relocation stress syndrome.

Envision a seamless, stress-free move where all you need to do is travel to your new home to find a fully set up and organized space, that even feels like home. We can make this happen!

Seniors in Stride will:

  • Develop a full transition plan to meet your specific needs
  • Create customized floor plans
  • Review space planning opportunities
  • Interview, schedule and oversee movers
  • Manage shipments and storage
  • Sort and catalogue items
  • Manage professional packing
  • Prepare new home as required, clean, unpack and provide full set up
  • Smoothly settle you in

Research shows that relocation can cause relocation stress syndrome (RSS), a condition that is more often seen in older adults.  Hiring a professional to help in a relocation project, can help smooth the transition and thus mitigate the risk of RSS.

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